On 19 December 2018, our Chairperson Şebnem Korur Fincancı, in the case she was being tried for signing the petition titled “We Will Not Be A Party To This Crime” as one of the Academics for Peace, was sentenced to 2 years 6 months imprisonment by the 37th Heavy Penal Court in Çağlayan, Istanbul. In our appeal to this decision we also made an AMICUS CURIAE SUBMISSION.

On 26 July 2019, the Constitutional Court ruled that the freedom of expression of the Academics for Peace had been violated. Following this binding ruling, in the new judicial year, heavy penal courts began to rule for acquittal, reaching a total of 94 acquittal rulings as of today in continuing cases.

As for the 204 finalized verdicts, like that of our Chairperson Şebnem Korur Fincancı, they are expected to be either reversed by the appeal court, or sent back to heavy penal courts where they will be concluded in acquittal.

We take this opportunity to share with you (first in the English original, followed by the Turkish translation) the AMICUS CURIAE SUBMISSION prepared by Dr Lutz Oette, Senior Lecturer of Law and Director of the Centre for Human Rights Law, SOAS, University of London and Dr Carla Ferstman, Senior Lecturer of Law at the School of Law and Human Rights Centre, University of Essex.

Yargılandığı Barış Akademisyenleri davasında başkanımız Şebnem Korur Fincancı hakkında 37. ACM, 19 Aralık 2018 tarihinde 2 yıl 6 ay hapis cezasına hükmetmişti.

Bu karara itiraz ederken bir de Uzman Bilirkişi Görüşü sunmuştuk.

Anayasa Mahkemesi 26 Temmuz 2019 tarihli kararında Barış Akademisyenleri’nin ifade özgürlüğünün ihlal edildiği yönünde karar verdi. Bu bağlayıcı kararın ardından yeni adli yılda ağır ceza mahkemeleri peş peşe beraat kararları vermeye başladı. Devam eden yargılamalarda şu ana kadar toplam 94 beraat kararı verildi.

Başkanımız Şebnem Korur Fincancı’nınki gibi kesinleşen 204 kararın da istinaf mahkemesi tarafından, veya yeniden yargılamalarla bozularak beraat kararı verilmesi bekleniyor.

Bu vesileyle Londra Üniversitesi SOAS İnsan Hakları Hukuku Merkezi Direktörü ve Kıdemli Okutman Lutz Oette ve Essex Üniversitesi, İnsan Hakları Merkezi ve Hukuk Fakültesinde Kıdemli Okutman Ferstman hazırlanan Uzman Bilirkişi Görüşü’nü (üstte İngilizce aslı, devamında Türkçe çevirisi) paylaşıyoruz:

London, June 20, 2019

In the matter concerning

Rasime Sebnem KORUR

Case No. 2019/121 E.before the İstanbul Regional Court of Justice, 3rd Penal Chamber

 

On Appeal from

the Decision of the 37th Heavy Penal Court, 19 December 2018

 

AMICUS CURIAE SUBMISSION

 

  1. INTRODUCTION

 

  1. This submission is made by Dr Lutz Oette, Senior Lecturer of Law and Director of the Centre for Human Rights Law, SOAS, University of London and Dr Carla Ferstman, Senior Lecturer of Law at the School of Law and Human Rights Centre, University of Essex. Both follow closely the legal developments in Turkey and have wide-ranging experience over many years in the key issues raised by this case.[1]

 

  1. Both amici have observed trials in Turkey (in Istanbul and in Cizre, South East Turkey) which have involved alleged offences concerning support of terrorism and terrorist propaganda, under Turkish criminal law, including but not limited to, proceedings involving the appellant, Dr Rasime Sebnem KORUR.

 

  1. The purpose of the amicus curiae submission is to provide comparative information on jurisprudence and practice of other jurisdictions of relevance to Turkey, with the view to assisting the judges with the issues we understand are before them.

 

 

  1. The ISSUES COVERED BY THIS SUBMISSION

 

  1. This submission covers the following issues:

 

  1. The status of international law in the Republic of Turkey;
  2. The terrorist offenses applied to the defendants and the principle of legality;
  • The terrorist offenses applied to the defendant and the application of the presumption of innocence;
  1. Freedom of expression in the context of States’ efforts to counter terrorism: essential guarantees;
  2. The important role of States to foster the work of human rights defenders in a counter-terrorism context;
  3. Academic freedom in the context of the criminal law prohibition against terrorism.

 

III. SUMMARY OF THE CASE

 

  1. This matter concerns the appeal of the verdict of the 37th Heavy Penal Court concerning Dr Rasime Sebnem KORUR, dated 19 December 2018, in which she was convicted of the crime of “making propaganda in favour of a terrorist organization” contrary to Article 7(2) of Law No. 3713. The conviction stems from an indictment of the Istanbul Public Prosecutor’s office dated 23 September 2017, investigation No. 2017/134592.

 

  1. Dr Korur was convicted for being involved in the “Academics for Peace Initiative”, supporting peace in the south-east of Turkey. In particular, she was convicted for signing a petition released in January 2016 calling for an end to violence in the region. In the petition, the signatories said that they were condemning both the state violence against the peoples of the region and the Turkish state’s ongoing violation of its own laws and international treaties. Additionally, cited in her judgment of conviction were certain statements attributed to her concerning the activities of the Turkish Armed Forces and related matters.

 

  1. Dr Korur was sentenced inter alia, to 1 year and 8 months imprisonment, which was increased to 1 year and 18 months, which took into account what was viewed as the aggravated aspect of the acts for which she was convicted, namely that she used the press and media to carry out those acts.

 

  1. THE STATUS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW IN THE REPUBLIC OF TURKEY

 

  1. In accordance with Article 90 of the Constitution of Turkey (Constitution of 1982, as amended in 2004), international agreements which are duly in force in Turkey have the force of law. In the case of a conflict between international agreements, duly put into effect, concerning fundamental rights and freedoms and the laws due to differences in provisions on the same matter, the provisions of international agreements shall prevail.

 

  1. According to the above mentioned constitutional rule and other relevant laws, international treaties ratified by the Turkish Government constitute an integral part of Turkish Law.

 

  1. TERRORIST OFFENSES APPLIED TO THE DEFENDANT AND THE

PRINCIPLE OF LEGALITY

 

The applicable principles under international law

 

  1. The principle of legality (nullum crimen, noella poena sine lege) is a fundamental principle of justice that means that no one may be accused or convicted of a criminal offence on account of any act or omission which did not constitute a criminal offence under national or international law at the time it was committed; nor may a heavier penalty be imposed than that which was applicable at the time the criminal offence was committed. It is set out in Article 15 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, ratified by Turkey on 23 September 2003. Also the United Nations Human Rights Committee, in its General Comment N° 29, has pointed out that the principle of legality in criminal matters cannot be subjected to derogation.[2] The principle is also reflected in Article 7(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights.

 

  1. The principle of legality requires that crimes be classified and described in precise and unambiguous language that narrowly defines the punishable offence, so that persons can know what behavior is prohibited by the law and to be sure that the law is not subject to interpretation which would unduly widen the scope of prohibited conduct, or result in the criminalisation of any legitimate form of exercise of fundamental freedoms. In the Kafkaris case, the European Court of Human Rights declared that :

 

[t]he guarantee enshrined in Article 7, which is an essential element of the rule of law, occupies a prominent place in the Convention system of protection … It should be construed and applied, as follows from its object and purpose, in such a way as to provide effective safeguards against arbitrary prosecution, conviction and punishment.[3]

 

  1. Vague and broad definitions are problematic because they can be used by States to unnecessarily penalise and discourage otherwise legitimate and lawful behaviour. This need for certainty which is embodied in the legality principle, has been interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights as requiring that criminal law must not be extensively construed to an accused’s detriment, for instance by analogy. This requires that the offence be clearly defined in law, so that “the individual can know from the wording of the relevant provision and, if need be, with the assistance of the court’s interpretation of it, what acts and omissions will make him liable”.[4]

 

  1. Criminal law concerning terrorist offences cannot deviate from these principles; “It is essential to ensure that the term ‘terrorism’ is confined in its use to conduct that is of a genuinely terrorist nature.”[5] Martin Scheinin, the former United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights while countering terrorism, has commented on this requirement of certainty in the criminal law in the particular context of legislation concerning terrorist offenses. He has noted that criminal law legislation which is overly broad or ambiguous may not only breach the legality principle, but may additionally offend the principles of necessity and proportionality:

 

f]ailure to restrict counter-terrorism laws and implementing measures to the countering of conduct which is truly terrorist in nature also pose the risk that, where such laws and measures restrict the enjoyment of rights and freedoms, they will offend the principles of necessity and proportionality that govern the permissibility of any restriction on human rights.[6]

 

  1. With respect to the particular issue of terrorist offences which rely on speech acts or incitement, as recommended in the Council of Europe Guidelines on protecting freedom of expression and information in times of crisis, “Member States should not use vague terms when imposing restrictions of freedom of expression and information in times of crisis. Incitement to violence and public disorder should be adequately and clearly defined.”[7]

 

  1. The Inter-American Court of Human Rights has taken a similar approach in relation to terrorism legislation in Peru. It held that:

 

The Court considers that crimes must be classified and described in precise and unambiguous language that narrowly defines the punishable offense, thus giving full meaning to the principle of nullum crimen nulla poena sine lege praevia in criminal law. This means a clear definition of the criminalized conduct, establishing its elements and the factors that distinguish it from behaviors that are either not punishable offences or are punishable but not with imprisonment. Ambiguity in describing crimes creates doubts and the opportunity for abuse of power, particularly when it comes to ascertaining the criminal responsibility of individuals and punishing their criminal behavior with penalties that exact their toll on the things that are most precious, such as life and liberty. Laws of the kind applied in the instant case, that fail to narrowly define the criminal behaviors, violate the principle of nullum crimen nulla poena sine lege praevia recognized in Article 9 of the American Convention.[8]

 

  1. Furthermore, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in another case against Peru, made clear that “the definition of a type of criminal offense based on mere suspicion or association shifts the burden of proof, violates the fundamental presumption of innocence of the accused, and should be eliminated.”[9]

 

The relevance of the principles to Turkish criminal law

 

  1. Article 7(2) of the Anti-Terrorism Law 3713 provides that:

 

Any person making propaganda for, legitimating or praising the methods of a terrorist organization, which comprise force, violence or threat, or for inciting these methods to be used, shall be punished with imprisonment from one to five years. If this crime is committed through means of press and media, the penalty shall be aggravated by one half. In addition, editors of press or publishing media that have not participated in the perpetration of the crime shall also be punished with a judicial fine at the rate of one thousand to five thousand days.

 

  1. The UN Special Rapporteur for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights while Countering Terrorism recommended that the definition of terrorist crimes be brought in line with international norms and standards “including defining more precisely what crimes constitute acts of terrorism and confining them to acts of deadly or otherwise grave violence against persons or the taking of hostages”; “only full clarity with regard to the definition of acts that constitute terrorist crimes can ensure that the crimes of membership, aiding and abetting and what certain authorities referred to as ‘crimes of opinion’ are not abused for purposes other than fighting terrorism.”[10]
  2. The references to ‘propaganda’ and ‘terrorist organization’ included in this law are extremely broad in light of the expansive definition of ‘terrorism’ in its article 1, and would ostensibly cover acts which would constitute lawful and legitimate human rights activity, such as the publication of views in support of political, legal, social or economic reform. Furthermore, the lack of precise legal definitions and criteria of what constitutes a terrorist organization and the offence of membership in such an organization makes these articles prone to arbitrary application and abuse.

 

  1. Article 7(2) of the Anti-Terrorism Law 3713 was amended through Law No. 6459 in 2013, following a series of judgments by the European Court of Human Rights in which it had expressed concerns over the wording and interpretation of the provision, particularly the absence of any link to violence (see below at paragraphs 24-25).[11] The amended law establishes such a connection between the propaganda and methods of violence, threats or coercion. However, as set out below in paragraph 25 and further in paragraphs 38-45 in relation to the petition signed by the accused, the amended provision continues to provide scope for broad interpretation that runs counter to the required narrow construction and the notion of precision and predictability integral to the notion of legality.

 

  1. THE TERRORIST OFFENSES APPLIED TO THE DEFENDANT AND THE PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

 

  1. The presumption of innocence is a fundamental principle of human rights law.[12] It means that defendants are deemed innocent until proven guilty by court in a final judgment in accordance with the law. The presumption of innocence presupposes that the burden of proof is on the prosecution. Any doubt on guilt should benefit the suspect or accused person (‘in dubio pro reo’).[13] This is underscored by General Comment 32 of the United Nations Human Rights Committee:

 

The presumption of innocence, which is fundamental to the protection of human rights, imposes on the prosecution the burden of proving the charge, guarantees that no guilt can be presumed until the charge has been proved beyond reasonable doubt, ensures that the accused has the benefit of doubt and requires that persons accused of a criminal act must be treated in accordance with this principle.[14]

 

  1. The United Nations Human Rights Committee has made clear that, for a conviction to be entered in relation to any criminal offence, the Prosecution must demonstrate that every element of that offence has been proven to the necessary standard:

 

Whether a particular act or omission gives rise to a conviction for a criminal offence is not an issue which can be determined in the abstract; rather, this question can only be answered after a trial pursuant to which evidence is adduced to demonstrate that the elements of the offence have been proven to the necessary standard. If a necessary element of the offence, as described in national (or international) law, cannot be properly proven to have existed, then it follows that a conviction of a person for the act or omission in question would violate the principle of nullum crimen sine lege, and the principle of legal certainty, provided by article 15, paragraph 1.[15]

 

  1. There must be significant and probative evidence on each required element of the crime, leading to no other possible conclusion that the crime has been committed. A court’s judgment must be based on evidence as put before it and not on mere allegations or assumptions.[16] In international criminal law, the principle has been incorporated into the statutes and jurisprudence of international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court. The Yugoslavia Tribunal clarified that this standard “requires a finder of fact to be satisfied that there is no reasonable explanation of the evidence other than the guilt of the accused”.[17]

 

  1. The European Court of Human Rights has had occasion to consider in a series of cases, convictions by Turkish courts for ‘propaganda’ glorifying a terrorist organization contrary to Law 3713. In particular, the European Court of Human Rights has underscored that mere dissent cannot constitute a crime; incitement to violence or armed resistance is an essential element of the offence. A conviction which does not prove according to the requisite standard of proof that an individual’s speech acts were done with a view to inciting violence or armed resistance would make that conviction unsound. For instance, in the case of Faruk Temel v. Turkey, the Court, in finding that the conviction and the treatment of the petitioner breached Article 10 of the European Convention, noted that: “[T]he statement read as a whole does not encourage the use of violence, armed resistance or uprising and – a fundamental element to be taken into consideration – that it does not constitute a discourse either of hatred. The content of the statement was also not likely to promote violence by instilling a deep and irrational hatred towards identified individuals. It follows that the applicant’s criminal conviction did not meet a ‘pressing social need’.”[18]

 

  1. In the case of Öner and Türk v. Turkey, the European Court of Human Rights observed that, in that case “the speech in question consisted of a critical assessment of Turkey’s policies concerning the Kurdish problem. The applicants expressed discontent with respect to certain policies of the government, the practices of the security forces, and the detention conditions of Abdullah Öcalan, whereas the domestic courts considered that the impugned speech contained terrorist propaganda. The Court considers that, taken as a whole, the applicant’s speech does not encourage violence, armed resistance or an uprising. Moreover, the speeches in question delivered by the applicants were not capable of inciting violence by instilling a deep-seated and irrational hatred against identifiable persons and therefore did not constitute hate speech.”[19] As part of the execution of judgments, the Committee of Ministers expressed its regret that, …

no progress had been reported in the implementation of the legislation so as to comply with Convention standards (see CM/Del/Dec(2017)1294/H46-31, 1294th meeting, September 2017). It therefore urged the authorities to take: complementary legislative or other measures to ensure that criminal investigations are not initiated solely on the basis of expressions of opinion unless compelling reasons exist, such as incitement to violence or hatred; measures to ensure that individuals are not taken into police custody or detained on remand when the evidence in the investigation or case-file concerns solely expressions of opinion, unless compelling reasons exist, such as incitement to violence or hatred; and measures to align the practice of prosecutors and first instance courts to ensure that they apply the case law of the Constitutional Court and the European Court under Article 10 of the Convention.[20]

 

  1. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION IN THE CONTEXT OF STATES’ EFFORTS

TO COUNTER TERRORISM: ESSENTIAL GUARANTEES

 

  1. Freedom of expression is “one of the essential foundations of a democratic society and one of the basic conditions for its progress and for each individual’s self-fulfilment.”[21] The right to freedom of expression is recognised in article 26 of the Turkish Constitution and in article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights as well as article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, both of which are binding on Turkey as a State party.

 

  1. The scope of freedom of expression is broad, in recognition of its fundamental role as part of the public and political debate in a pluralistic, democratic society. This applies particularly to ‘political discourse’ and the ‘discussion of human rights’.[22] Discussion of human rights, including advocacy that highlights concerns about violations of rights guaranteed in national and international law, is specifically protected in article 6 of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Defenders,[23] which recognises the importance of free expression in the promotion and protection of human rights:

 

Everyone has the right, individually and in association with others: …

 

(b) As provided for in human rights and other applicable international instruments, freely to publish, impart or disseminate to others  views, information and knowledge on all human rights and fundamental freedoms;

(c) To study, discuss, form and hold opinions on the observance, both in law and practice, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms, and, through these and other appropriate means, to draw public attention to those matters.

 

  1. Considering the importance of political debate, freedom of expression recognises speech even if it is considered to be offensive.[24] As established in the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, “[s]ubject to paragraph 2 of Article 10, [freedom of expression] is applicable not only to ‘information’ or ‘ideas’ that are favourably received or regarded as inoffensive or as a matter of indifference, but also to those that offend, shock or disturb. Such are the demands of that pluralism, tolerance and broadmindedness without which there is no ‘democratic society’.”[25] In a number of cases, the European Court of Human Rights has recognised that language falling within the scope of the right comprises words such as ‘massacres’, for example where used to raise concerns about alleged violations of fundamental rights, such as the right to life.[26] Most relevant to the present case, the European Court of Human Rights has determined that the right covers speech including “a critical assessment of Turkey’s policies concerning the Kurdish problem”, and “discontent with respect to certain policies of the government, the practices of the security forces, and the detention conditions of Abdullah Öcalan.”[27]

 

Limitations on the right to freedom of expression

 

  1. The right to freedom of expression is qualified. Where an expression made falls within the scope of the right, the state may under certain circumstances legitimately limit the exercise of the right, provided that such limitation is prescribed by law, has a legitimate aim, and is proportionate. Freedom of expression is therefore the rule, and any limitations are exceptional.

 

Prescribed by law

 

  1. Freedom of expression “is subject to exceptions, which must, however, be construed strictly, and the need for any restrictions must be established convincingly.”[28] Any interference with the right, such as criminalising certain forms of expression, must be prescribed by law. Such law must be “formulated with sufficient precision to enable the person concerned to regulate his or her conduct: he or she need to be able – if need be with appropriate advice – to foresee, to a degree that was reasonable in the circumstances, the consequences that a given action could entail.”[29] In addition, the compatibility of legal norms “with the rule of law [must] be ensured.”[30]

 

  1. As emphasised by the United Nations Human Rights Committee, “[s]uch offences as ‘encouragement of terrorism’ and ‘extremist activity’ as well as offences of ‘praising’, ‘glorifying’, or ‘justifying’ terrorism should be clearly defined to ensure that they do not lead to unnecessary or disproportionate interference with freedom of expression.”[31]

 

  1. This requirement for precision applies to article 7(2) of the Anti-Terrorism Law 3713, which criminalises propaganda for a terrorist organisation. The European Court of Human Rights has criticised the lack of accessibility and foreseeability of article 7(2), particularly where its interpretation is not entirely clear.[32]

 

  1. Also, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression identified several shortcomings when analysing Turkish legislation in light of applicable international human rights standards on freedom of expression:

 

The Government has a critical duty to protect against terrorist threats, but international law mandates respect for human rights in the fight against terrorism. In keeping with these dual requirements, criminal offences should be narrowly defined and applied according to strict implementation of the standards of necessity and proportionality. Despite this, counter-terrorism and national security provisions in Turkish legislation are used to restrict freedom of expression through overly broad and vague language that allows for subjective interpretation without adequate judicial oversight.[33]

 

Legitimate aim

 

  1. Any restriction of freedom of expression must serve a legitimate aim such as the maintenance of national security and public safety, however such aims cannot be interpreted in the abstract. While the aim of the Anti-Terrorism Law may be legitimate, provisions “that permit interference with Convention rights must be interpreted restrictively.”[34] This necessitates evidence to the sufficient standard of proof that any statements actually risk jeopardising national security and public safety. The fact that a statement is critical of government conduct, and is therefore considered inappropriate, is not sufficient ground to restrict it. The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression concluded, following his mission to Turkey, that there is “limited evidence that the restrictions [of freedom of expression] are necessary to protect legitimate interests, such as national security and public order…” [35]

 

Proportionate

 

  1. Any restriction must also be necessary in a democratic society, which “implies the existence of a ‘pressing social need’.”[36] This entails a contextual assessment to “determine whether the interference in issue was ‘proportionate to the legitimate aims pursued’ and whether the reasons adduced by the national authorities to justify it are ‘relevant and sufficient’. In doing so, the Court has to satisfy itself that the national authorities applied standards which were in conformity with the principles embodied in Article 10 and, moreover, that they based themselves on an acceptable assessment of the relevant facts.”[37]

 

  1. States may legitimately criminalise certain terrorism offences, and may even be obliged to do so pursuant to United Nations Security Council resolutions or treaties to which they have become a party, such as the Council of Europe Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism (196/2005) ratified by Turkey on 23 March 2012. However, such anti-terrorism legislation, and its interpretation and application, must itself be compatible with the right of freedom to expression. As recognised in article 12(1) of the Council of Europe Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism:

 

Each Party shall ensure that the establishment, implementation and application of the criminalisation under Articles 5 to 7 and 9 of this Convention are carried out while respecting human rights obligations, in particular the right to freedom of expression… as set forth in, where applicable to that Party, the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and other obligations under international law.

 

  1. The European Court of Human Rights scrutinises the criminalisation of freedom of expression, taking into consideration the nature of the speech and speaker, the content of any statement made in terms of whether it constitutes incitement to violence, and the context, namely whether it is likely that it will cause violence: “Regard must be had … to the words used and the context in which they were published, with a view to determining whether the texts taken as a whole can be considered as inciting to violence.”[38]

 

Application to the ‘Academics for Peace Initiative’ petition, released in January 2016

 

  1. The statement “We will not be party to the crime” was published and signed by academics and researchers as part of a wider political debate on the conduct of Turkish forces in the South-East of Turkey, and its impact on the rights of the region’s population. It therefore contributed to the public debate on public institutions. As a general rule, “in circumstances of public debate concerning public figures in the political domain and public institutions, the value placed by the Covenant [on Civil and Political Rights] upon uninhibited expression is particularly high.”[39] There is no duty of restraint for academics or others in prominent positions, under international human rights law on the right to freedom of expression. On the contrary, the European Court of Human Rights has emphasised “that there is little scope under Article 10 § 2 of the Convention for restrictions on freedom of expression in the area of political speech or debate, where that freedom is of the utmost importance.”[40] These “principles also apply to measures taken by domestic authorities to maintain national security and public order as part of the fight against terrorism.”[41]

 

  1. The academic authors and signatories to the statement published and signed on to it in the exercise of their academic freedom. They are also human rights defenders as recognised in the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, namely “individuals, groups and associations … contributing to … the effective elimination of all violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of peoples and individuals.”

 

  1. The publication of a statement that draws attention to human rights violations and requests accountability and an end to violations falls within the scope of recognised human rights promotion and protection. This includes action to address human rights situations on behalf of individuals or groups, disseminating information on violations, and action to secure accountability and to end impunity.[42] The United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Defenders recognises that human rights defenders fulfil a valuable role and merit special protection.[43] The United Nations Human Rights Committee has equally recognised that “[s]tates parties should put in place effective measures to protect against attacks aimed at silencing those exercising their right to freedom of expression. Paragraph 3 [of article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights] may never be invoked as a justification for the muzzling of any advocacy of multi-party democracy, democratic tenets and human rights.”[44]

 

  1. According to the second element of the three-tier test set out above (paragraph 29), any restriction to freedom of expression would only be capable of being justified if the statement incites violence or the commission of a violent crime. The statement “We will not be party to the crime” uses terms such as ‘deliberate and planned massacre’, ‘torture’, and ‘deportation’. These terms refer to alleged violations and notwithstanding the fact that they might be considered to constitute criticism, the European Court of Human Rights has consistently held that the mere use of such terminology does not amount to incitement to violence.[45]

 

  1. The statement does not mention violence, does not include any threats to this effect, nor does it have any passages that indicate any intent to foster terrorism. There is no evidence of any intention to legitimise acts of terrorism, or to prevent Turkey from taking counter-terrorism measures in accordance with international human rights law. On the contrary, the statement calls for an end to human rights violations and violence, and for a peaceful resolution of the situation. It therefore constitutes legitimate advocacy to promote compliance with international human rights standards, which is aimed at uncovering the truth.

 

  1. The Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights stated that he “regards this declaration as falling clearly within the boundaries of freedom of expression, and the concerns behind it as legitimate and of interest to the public, in particular given the many human rights violations which, according to the Commissioner, were indeed committed during the curfews and anti-terrorism operations.”[46]

 

  1. The statement does not amount to indirect incitement either. The use of certain terminology such as massacre, or torture, is not sufficient to incite violence or propagate commission of terrorism offence. According to the European Court of Human Rights, states cannot invoke aims such as national security to restrict the right of the public to be informed where opinions do not incite violence, i.e. advocate the use of violent methods or bloody revenge, or justify the commission of terrorist acts with a view to achieving the objectives of their supporters, and cannot be interpreted as promoting violence by instilling a deep and irrational hatred towards identified persons.[47]

 

  1. The statement, under any of the tests applied in relation to freedom of expression, does neither directly nor indirectly call for violence, has no demonstrable link to violence, or the threat thereof, and does not constitute a clear and present danger resulting in violence. There is no evident glorification of, or propaganda for, any terrorist organization. On the contrary, the statement clearly renounces all forms of violence.

 

  1. THE IMPORTANT ROLE OF STATES TO FOSTER THE WORK OF HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS IN A COUNTER-TERRORISM CONTEXT

 

  1. The protection of the work of human rights defenders under freedom of expression is set out in the previous section. Suffice to add that in accordance with relevant international standards, the State’s obligation is not simply one of refraining from impeding the work of human rights defenders – all States are obliged to take positive steps to foster an environment in which human rights defenders can freely carry out their work. In particular, the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Defenders makes clear in Paragraph 12 that:

 

  1. The State shall take all necessary measures to ensure the protection by the competent authorities of everyone, individually and in association with others, against any violence, threats, retaliation, de facto or de jure adverse discrimination, pressure or any other arbitrary action as a consequence of his or her legitimate exercise of the rights referred to in the present Declaration.

 

  1. In this connection, everyone is entitled, individually and in association with others, to be protected effectively under national law in reacting against or opposing, through peaceful means, activities and acts, including those by omission, attributable to States that result in violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms, as well as acts of violence perpetrated by groups or individuals that affect the enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

 

  1. In contrast to these international standards, the 37th Heavy Penal Court’s decision to convict and sentence Dr Rasime Sebnem KORUR, dated 19 December 2018, appears to have considered Dr Korur’s position as a human rights defender and academic, and her use of the press and media as an aggravating factor, for which she was provided an extra length of time imprisonment.

VII. ACADEMIC FREEDOM IN THE CONTEXT OF THE CRIMINAL LAW PROHIBITION AGAINST TERRORISM

  1. It is well recognised that academic freedom is a protected component of freedom of expression. The European Court of Human Rights has regularly underlined, including in cases concerning Turkey, “the importance of academic freedom, which comprises the academics’ freedom to express freely their opinion about the institution or system in which they work and freedom to distribute knowledge and truth without restriction.”[48]It has further affirmed that academic freedom “is not restricted to academic or scientific research, but also extends to the academics’ freedom to express freely their views and opinions, even if controversial or unpopular, in the areas of their research, professional expertise and competence. This may include an examination of the functioning of public institutions in a given political system, and a criticism thereof.”[49]
  2. In its Recommendation 1762 (2006), the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe adopted a declaration for the protection of academic freedom, which recognizes in accordance with the Magna Charta Universitatum that “academic freedom in research and in training should guarantee freedom of expression and of action, freedom to disseminate information and freedom to conduct research and distribute knowledge and truth without restriction.”[50] In the current case, the 37th Heavy Penal Court appears to have criminalized the statements of academics in violation of their right to academic freedom.

ALL OF WHICH IS RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED

London, 20 June 2019

[1] Additional information on the backgrounds of the amici curiae can be found on their websites:

Dr Lutz Oette: https://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff46048.php

Dr Carla Ferstman : https://www.essex.ac.uk/people/ferst81809/carla-ferstman

[2] Human Rights Committee ,General Comment N° 29, “States of emergency (article 4)”, para. 7, UN Doc. CCPR/C/21/Rev.1/Add.11 of 31 August 2001.

[3] Kafkaris v Cyprus, Application no. 21906/04, European Court of Human Rights (12 February 2008), para. 137.

[4] Kokkinakis v. Greece, Application no. 14307/88, European Court of Human Rights (25 May 1993), para. 52.

[5] Special Rapporteur on human rights and counter-terrorism, UN Doc. E/CN.4/2006/98 (2005) para. 42.

[6] Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, Martin Scheinin, UN Doc. A/HRC/16/51, 22 December 2010, para. 26.

[7] Guidelines of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe on protecting freedom of expression and information in times of crisis, adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 26 September 2007 at the 1005th meeting of the Ministers’ Deputies, Guideline IV, para.19.

[8] Castillo Petruzzi et al. v. Peru (Merits, Reparations and Costs) Judgment of 30 May 1999, Series C No. 52, para. 121.

[9] Annual Report of the Inter-American Commission: Peru, OEA/Ser.L/V/II.95, doc. 7 rev. (1996) Ch.V Section VIII, §4.

[10] Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of  human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism on his mission to Turkey (April 16-23, 2006), 16 November 2006.

[11] See Faruk Temel v. Turkey, Application no. 16853/05, European Court of Human Rights (1 February 2011); Yavuz and Yaylali v. Turkey, Application no. 12606/11, European Court of Human Rights (17 December 2013).

[12] See for example, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Article 14(2); European Convention on Human Rights Article 6(2).

[13] Human Rights Committee (HRC), General Comment 32, CCPR/GC/32 (23 August 2007), para. 30; Barberà,Messegué and Jabardo v Spain, Application No. 10590/83, European Court of Human Rights (6 December 1988), para. 77; Telfner v Austria, Application No. 33501/96, European Court of Human Rights (20 March 2001), para. 15.

[14] HRC General Comment 32, para. 30.

[15] Nicholas v Australia, HRC, UN Doc. CCPR/C/80/D/1080/2002 (2004) §7.5.

[16] Telfner v Austria Application No. 33501/96, European Court of Human Rights (20 March 2001), para. 19.

[17] Prosecutor v Milan Martić (IT-95-11-A), ICTY Appeals Chamber (8 October 2008) paras. 55, 61.

[18] Faruk Temel v. Turkey, Application no. 16853/05, , European Court of Human Rights (1 February 2011), para. 62. See also, Savgin v. Turkey, Application no. 13304/03, European Court of Human Rights (2 February 2010), para. 45.

[19] Öner and Türk v. Turkey, Application no. 51962/12, European Court of Human Rights (31 March 2015), para. 24.

[20] See, Council of Europe, Committee of Ministers, https://hudoc.exec.coe.int/eng#{%22fulltext%22:[%22oner%22],%22EXECDocumentTypeCollection%22:[%22CEC%22],%22EXECLanguage%22:[%22ENG%22],%22EXECState%22:[%22TUR%22],%22EXECIsClosed%22:[%22False%22],%22EXECIdentifier%22:[%22004-36806%22]}

[21] Erdoğdu and İnce vTurkey (Grand Chamber), Application nos. 25067/94, 25068/94, European Court of Human Rights (8 July 1999), para. 47.

[22] Human Rights Committee, General Comment 34, Article 19: Freedom of opinion and expression, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 September 2011), para.11.

[23] Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognized Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, A/RES/53/144 (8 March 1999).

[24] Human Rights Committee, General Comment 34, Article 19: Freedom of opinion and expression, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 September 2011), para.11.

[25] Erdoğdu and İnce vTurkey (Grand Chamber), Application nos. 25067/94, 25068/94, European Court of Human Rights (8 July 1999), para. 47.

[26] Karkin v. Turkey, Application No. 43928/98, European Court of Human Rights (23 September 2003), para. 34.

[27] Öner and Türk v. Turkey, Application no. 51962/12, European Court of Human Rights (31 March 2015), para. 24.

[28] Erdoğdu and İnce vTurkey (Grand Chamber), Application nos. 25067/94, 25068/94, European Court of Human Rights (8 July 1999), para. 47.

[29] Perinçek v Switzerland (Grand Chamber), Application No. 27510/08, European Court of Human Rights (15 October 2015), para. 131. See above, section on the principle of legality.

[30] Belge v Turkey, Application nos. 50171/09, 6/12/2016, European Court of Human Rights (6 December 2016), para. 28.

[31] Human Rights Committee, General Comment 34, Article 19: Freedom of opinion and expression, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 September 2011), para. 46.

[32] Belge v Turkey, Application Nos. 50171/09, 6/12/2016, European Court of Human Rights (6 December 2016), para. 29.

[33] Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression on his mission to Turkey, UN Doc. A/HRC/35/22/Add.3 (21 June 2017), para. 17.

[34] Perinçek v Switzerland, Application No. 27510/08 (Grand Chamber), European Court of Human Rights (15 October 2015), para.151.

[35] Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression on his mission to Turkey, UN Doc. A/HRC/35/22/Add.3 (21 June 2017), para. 7.

[36] Erdoğdu and İnce vTurkey (Grand Chamber), Application nos. 25067/94, 25068/94, European Court of Human Rights (8 July 1999), para. 47.

[37] Ibid.

[38] Özgür Gündem v Turkey, Application nos. 23144/93, European Court of Human Rights (16 March 2000), para. 63

[39] Human Rights Committee, General Comment 34, Article 19: Freedom of opinion and expression, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 September 2011), para. 38.

[40] Belge v. Turkey, Application no. 50171/09, European Court of Human Rights (6 December 2016), para.31.

[41] Ibid. (references omitted)

[42] See in particular articles 6 and 12 of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights Defenders.

[43] Article 2, ibid.

[44] Human Rights Committee, General Comment 34, Article 19: Freedom of opinion and expression, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 September 2011), para. 23.

[45] Sürek v Turkey No.4, Application no. 24762/94, European Court of Human Rights (8 July 1999), para. 58.

[46] Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, Memorandum on freedom of expression and media freedom in Turkey, CommDH(2017)5, para. 62.

[47] Gözel and Özer v Turkey, Application no. 43453/04; 31098/05, European Court of Human Rights (6 July 2010) para. 56 (based on French translation).

[48] See, e.g., Sorguç v. Turkey, Application no. 17089/03, European Court of Human Rights (23 June 2009), para. 35; Kula v. Turkey, Application no. 20233/06, European Court of Human Rights (19 June 2018).

[49] Mustafa Erdoğan and Others v. Turkey, Application nos. 346/04 and 39779/04, European Court of Human Rights (27 May 2014), para. 40.

[50] Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, Recommendation 1762 (2006) ‘Academic freedom and university autonomy’, adopted 30 June 2006.

 

 

Londra, 20 Haziran 2019

 

Rasime Şebnem Korur hakkında

37’inci Ağır Ceza Mahkemesi tarafından 19 Aralık 2018 tarihinde verilen ve

İtiraz edilen Kararla ilgili

İstanbul Bölge Adliye Mahkemesi 3. Ceza Dairesi nezdinde yürütülen   2019/121 E. sayılı davaya

 

UZMAN BİLİRKİŞİ GÖRÜŞÜ

 

GİRİŞ

 

  1. Bu uzman görüşü, Londra Üniversitesi SOAS İnsan Hakları Hukuku Merkezi Direktörü ve Kıdemli Okutman Lutz Oette ve Essex Üniversitesi, İnsan Hakları Merkezi ve Hukuk Fakültesinde Kıdemli Okutman Ferstman tarafından verilmiştir.  Her iki kişi de Türkiye’deki hukuki gelişmeleri yakından takip etmektedir ve bu davanın ortaya çıkarttığı kilit konulara ilişkin uzun yılları kapsayan geniş deneyim sahibidir.[1]

 

  1. Her iki uzman da Dr. Rasime Şebnem Korur’un yargılanma süreci dahil olmak üzere, Türkiye’de (İstanbul’da ve Cizre’de) Türk ceza kanunlarında yer alan terörizm propagandası iddiası ile görülmekte olan davalarda gözlemci olarak bulunmuştur.

 

  1. Bu uzman bilirkişi görüşünün amacı, yargıçlara incelemekte olduklarını anladığımız konulara ilişkin destek olmak amacıyla, Türk Hukuku’nun uygulama ve yorumlanmasıyla ilişkili diğer hukuk sistemlerinden yargı kararları ve uygulamalar konusunda karşılaştırmalı bilgiler sağlamaktır.

 

  1. BU GÖRÜŞÜN KAPSAMINDA OLAN KONULAR

 

  1. Bu uzman görüşü aşağıdaki konuları kapsamaktadır:

 

  1. Türkiye Cumhuriyetinde uluslararası hukukun yeri;
  2. Davalılara yöneltilen terör suçları ve kanunilik ilkesi;
  • Davalıya yöneltilen terör suçları ve masumiyet karinesinin uygulanması
  1. Devletlerin terörle mücadelesi bağlamında ifade özgürlüğü: temel güvenceler;
  2. Devletlerin, terörle mücadele bağlamında insan hakları savunucularının çalışmalarına destek olmadaki önemli rolü;
  3. Terörizme karşı ceza hukuku yasakları bağlamında akademik özgürlük.

 

 

III. DAVANIN ÖZETİ

 

  1. Bu dava, 19 Aralık 2018 tarihinde Dr. Rasime Şebnem KORUR’a ilişkin olarak 37’inci Ağır Ceza Mahkemesinin vermiş olduğu kararın itirazı ile ilgili olup, söz konusu kararda kendisi 3713 sayılı Kanunun 7(2) Maddesinin hilafına olarak “bir terör örgütü lehine propaganda yapma” suçundan suçlu bulunmuştur. Mahkumiyet kararı, İstanbul Cumhuriyet Başsavcılığının 2017/134592 sayılı 23 Eylül 2017 tarihli soruşturması kapsamında hazırlanan iddianameye dayanmaktadır.

 

  1. Korur, Türkiye’nin güney doğusunda barışı destekleyen “Barış İçin Akademisyenler Girişimine” dahil olduğu için mahkum edilmiştir. Özel olarak, bölgedeki şiddete bir son verilmesi çağrısında bulunan, Ocak 2016’da yayınlanmış olan bir bildiriyi imzaladığı için hakkında mahkumiyet kararı verilmiştir. Bildiride, imza sahipleri, bölge halklarına karşı uygulanan devlet şiddeti ve Türk devletinin kendi kanunlarını ve tarafı olduğu uluslararası anlaşmaları ihlal etmesini kınadıklarını belirtmişlerdir.  Buna ek olarak, mahkumiyetine ilişkin kararda, Türk Silahlı Kuvvetleri’nin faaliyetleri ve diğer ilgili konulara ilişkin kendisine atfedilen belli ifadeler yer almaktadır.

 

  1. Korur, kendisine verilen diğer cezaların yanında, 1 yıl 8 ay hapis cezasına çarptırılmış olup, bu ceza, suçlu bulunduğu eylemlerin ağırlaştırıcı unsuru olarak değerlendirilen, bu eylemleri gerçekleştirmek için basın ve medyayı kullanmış olması nedeniyle 1 yıl 18 aya yükseltilmiştir.

 

  1. TÜRKİYE CUMHURİYETİNDE ULUSLARARASI HUKUKUN YERİ

 

  1. Türkiye Anayasası’nın 90’ıncı Maddesi uyarınca (2004 yılında değiştirildiği şekliyle 1982 Anayasası) Türkiye’de usulünce yürürlüğe girmiş olan uluslararası anlaşmalar kanun hükmündedir. Usulüne göre yürürlüğe konulmuş temel hak ve özgürlüklere ilişkin milletlerarası andlaşmalarla kanunların aynı konuda farklı hükümler içermesi nedeniyle çıkabilecek uyuşmazlıklarda milletlerarası andlaşma hükümleri esas alınır.

 

  1. Yukarıda belirtilmiş olan anayasa maddesine ve diğer ilgili kanun maddelerine göre, Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Hükümeti tarafından onaylanan uluslararası anlaşmalar, Türk Kanunları’nın dahili bir parçasını teşkil etmektedir.

 

  1. DAVALIYA YÖNELTİLEN TERÖR SUÇLAMALARI VE KANUNİLİK İLKESİ

 

İlgili uluslararası hukuk ilkeleri

 

  1. Kanunilik ilkesi (nullum crimen, noellapoena sine lege) hukukun temel bir ilkesi olup, Hiç kimse, işlendiği zamanda ulusal ya da uluslararası hukuk bakımından suç sayılmayan bir fiil ya da ihmal yüzünden suçlu sayılamayacağını ve suç sayılan bir fiile, işlendiği zaman yürürlükte olan bir cezadan daha ağır ceza verilemeyeceğini ifade etmektedir.. Bu ilke, Türkiye’nin 23 Eylül 2003 tarihinde onaylamış olduğu, Uluslararası Medeni ve Siyasi Haklara İlişkin Uluslararası Sözleşme’nin 15. Maddesi’nce düzenlenmektedir. Ayrıca, Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Komitesi, 29 sayılı Genel Yorumunda, cezai konularda kanunilik ilkesine istisna getirilemeyeceğine işaret etmiştir[2]. Bu ilke aynı zamanda Avrupa İnsan Hakları Sözleşmesi Madde 7(1)’de de yer almaktadır.

 

  1. Kanunilik ilkesi, ceza gerektiren suçların kesin, muğlak olmayan ve suçu dar bir şekilde tanımlayan bir dil ile sınıflandırılması ve tanımlanmasını gerektirmektedir. Böylelikle kişiler kanun tarafından hangi davranışın yasaklandığını öngörebilecek ve kanunun yasaklanan davranışın kapsamını genişletebilecek şekilde usulsüzce yorumlanmasına veya temel hak ve özgürlüklerin meşru bir şekilde icrasının suç olarak yorumlanmasına tabi tutulmayacaktır. Kafkaris davasında, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi şu beyanda bulunmuştur:

 

Madde 7’de verilmiş olan ve hukukun egemenliğinin önemli bir unsuru olan güvence, Sözleşmedeki (AİHS) koruma sisteminde önemli bir yer işgal etmektedir… Bu madde amaç ve hedefe uygun bir şekilde, keyfi kovuşturma, hüküm verme ve cezalandırmaya karşı etkili koruma sağlayacak şekilde yorumlanmalı ve uygulanmalıdır[3].

 

  1. Muğlak ve geniş tanımlamalar sorunludur, çünkü bunlar Devletler tarafından normalde meşru ve kanuni olan davranışları gereksiz yere cezalandırmak ve engellemek için kullanılabilir. Kanunilik ilkesinin içinde yer alan bu kesinlik ihtiyacı, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi tarafından, ceza hukukunun, örneğin kıyaslama yoluyla, suçlanan bir kişinin aleyhine geniş bir şekilde yorumlanmamasını gerektirdiği şeklinde yorumlanmıştır.  Bu, suçun kanunda açık bir şekilde tanımlanmasını gerektirmektedir, böylelikle “şahıs ilgili hükmün metninden ve ihtiyaç olması halinde, mahkemenin yorumu yardımıyla, hangi eylem ve ihmalin onu sorumlu kılacağını bilebilir[4]”.

 

  1. Terör suçlarına ilişkin ceza hukuku bu ilkelerden sapamaz: “Terörizm teriminin kullanımının özünde terörist nitelikte olan davranışlar ile sınırlı tutulmasının sağlanması önemlidir[5]

Terörle Mücadelede İnsan Haklarının Desteklenmesi ve Korunmasına İlişkin eski Birleşmiş Milletler Özel Raportörü Martin Scheinin, terör suçlarına ilişin mevzuatın özel bağlamında ceza hukukunda kesinlik gerekliliğine ilişkin yorumda bulunmuştur.  Çok fazla geniş veya muğlak olan ceza hukuku mevzuatının sadece kanunilik ilkesini ihlal etmekle kalmayacağı, aynı zamanda zorunluluk ve orantılılık ilkelerine de zarar vereceğini vurgulamıştır:

 

Terörle mücadele kanunlarının sınırlandırılmaması ve yapı olarak gerçek anlamda terör nitelikli olan davranışla mücadele etmek dışında tedbirlerin uygulanması; söz konusu kanunlar ve tedbirlerin, haklar ve özgürlüklerden faydalanılmasını kısıtladığı durumlarda, insan haklarına yönelik herhangi bir kısıtlamanın meşruiyetini düzenleyen kriterlerden zorunluluk ve orantılılık ilkelerinin de ihlali riskini doğurur[6].

 

  1. Avrupa Konseyi’nin Kriz Dönemlerinde İfade ve Bilgi Edinme Özgürlüğünün Korunmasına ilişkin Kılavuz İlkeleri’nde önerildiği şekilde ifade eylemleri veya tahrike dayalı terör suçları konusuna ilişkin olarak, “Üye Devletler, kriz dönemlerinde ifade ve bilgi edinme özgürlüğü üzerinde kısıtlama koyarken muğlak ifadeler kullanmamalıdır.  Şiddete ve kamu düzenini bozmaya teşvik yeterli ve açık bir şekilde tanımlanmalıdır[7].”

 

  1. İnter-Amerikan İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi, Peru’daki terör mevzuatına ilişkin olarak benzer bir yaklaşım benimsemiştir.  Şöyle belirtmektedir:

 

Mahkeme, suçların kesin ve muğlak olmayan bir dil ile, cezalandırılabilir suçları dar şekilde tanımlamak suretiyle sınıflandırılması ve tanımlanması gerektiği, böylelikle, ceza hukukunda nullum crimen nullapoena sine lege praevia (kanunsuz ceza olmaz) ilkesine tam anlamının verilmesi gerektiği görüşündedir.  Bu, cezalandırılacak davranışın unsurlarının ve bu davranışı, cezalandırılabilir suç teşkil etmeyen veya cezalandırılabilir olan ancak hapis cezası gerektirmeyen davranışlardan ayırt eden faktörlerin belirtilmesi suretiyle açık bir şekilde tanımlanması anlamına gelmektedir.  Suçların tarifinde muğlaklık, özellikle bireylerin cezai sorumluluğunun kesin olarak tespit edilmesi veya suç teşkil eden davranışın, yaşam ve özgürlük gibi en kıymetli olan şeyler ile orantılı cezalar ile cezalandırılması söz konusu olduğunda, gücün suiistimali şüphesine sebep olur ve bunun için fırsat doğurur.  Mevcut davaya konu kanunlar suç teşkil eden davranışları dar bir şekilde tanımlayamamaktadır ve Amerikan Sözleşmesi Madde 9’da belirtilmiş olan nullum crimen nullapoena sine lege praevia ilkesini ihlal etmektedir[8].

 

  1. Ayrıca, Peru’ya yönelik açılan  diğer bir davada İnter-Amerikan İnsan Hakları Komisyonu şunu açıkça belirtmiştir: “sadece şüphe veya ilişkilendirmeye dayalı tipteki bir suç tanımı, ispat yükünü terse çevirmekle, suçlanan kişinin temel masumiyet karinesini ihlal etmekte olacağı için  engellenmelidir[9].”

 

Uluslararası ilkelerin Türk ceza yasaları ile ilişkisi

 

  1. 3713 sayılı Terörle Mücadele Kanunu Madde 7(2) şöyle demektedir:

 

Terör örgütünün; cebir, şiddet veya tehdit içeren yöntemlerini meşru gösterecek veya övecek ya da bu yöntemlere başvurmayı teşvik edecek şekilde propagandasını yapan kişi, bir yıldan beş yıla kadar hapis cezası ile cezalandırılır. Bu suçun basın ve yayın yolu ile işlenmesi hâlinde, verilecek ceza yarı oranında artırılır. Ayrıca, basın ve yayın organlarının suçun işlenmesine iştirak etmemiş olan yayın sorumluları hakkında da bin günden beş bin güne kadar adli para cezasına hükmolunur.

 

  1. Birleşmiş Milletler Terörle Mücadelede İnsan Haklarının Desteklenmesi ve Korunması Özel Raportörü “hangi suçların terör eylemi teşkil ettiğinin daha kesin bir şekilde tanımlanması ve bunların kişilere karşı ölümcül veya ağır şiddet olayları içeren veya rehin alma durumları ile kısıtlı kılınması”; “terör suçlarını teşkil eden eylemlerin tanımlanmasına ilişkin olarak tam bir netlikle üyelik, yardım ve yataklık suçları belirtilmesi ve belli mercilerce ‘fikir suçu’ olarak adlandırılan eylemlerin terörle mücadele dışında herhangi bir amaçla suiistimal edilmemesi” dahil olmak üzere, teröre ilişkin suçların tanımı uluslararası normlar ve standartlar ile uyumlu hale getirilmesi tavsiyesinde bulunmuştur[10].
  2. Bu kanun kapsamında yer alan “propaganda” ve “terör örgütü” ifadeleri, 1’inci Maddesinde belirtilmiş olan kapsamlı “terör” tanımı ışığı altında değerlendirildiğinde aşırı derecede geniştir ve görünürde, siyasi, hukuki, sosyal ve ekonomik reformu destekleyen fikirlerin yayınlanması gibi yasal ve meşru insan hakları faaliyetlerini teşkil edecek eylemleri kapsamaktadır. Ayrıca, yasada terör örgütü ve terör örgütüne üyelik suçunu neyin teşkil ettiğine ilişkin kesin hukuki tanımlar ve kriterlerin bulunmaması, bu maddeleri keyfi uygulama ve suiistimale açık hale getirmektedir.

 

  1. Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi’nin 3713 sayılı Terörle Mücadele Kanunu’nun 7(2) Maddesi’nin metnine ve yorumlanmasına ve özellikle şiddet ile herhangi bir bağlantı kurmamasına ilişkin endişeler ifade ettiği bir dizi kararını (aşağıdaki paragraf 24 – 25’e bakınız) takiben bu kanun 2013 yılında 6459 sayılı Kanun ile tadil edilmiştir.[11] Tadil edilmiş kanun, propaganda ile şiddet, tehdit veya zorlama yöntemleri arasında gereken bağlantıyı kurmaktadır. Ancak, aşağıda paragraf 25’te ve ayrıca paragraf 38- 45’te sanık tarafından imzalanan bildiriye ilişkin olarak belirtildiği üzere, tadil edilmiş olan hüküm halen gerekli dar tanımdan yoksundur ve kanunilik nosyonunun temelinde yer alan kesinlik ve tahmin edilebilirlik niteliklerinin aksine işler bir şekilde geniş yorumlamaya imkan sağlamaya devam etmektedir.

 

  1. DAVALIYA ATFEDİLEN TERÖR SUÇLARI VE MASUMİYET KARİNESİ

 

  1. Masumiyet karinesi, insan hakları hukukunun temel bir ilkesidir.[12] Zanlıların, kanuna uygun olarak bir nihai yargı kararı ile mahkeme tarafından suçlu olduğu kanıtlanana kadar masum kabul edilmesi gerektiği anlamına gelmektedir. Masumiyet karinesi ispat yükümlülüğünün savcılık makamında olduğunu öngörmektedir. Suça ilişkin her türlü şüphe, şüpheli veya sanığın menfaatine işlemelidir (‘in dubio pro reo’).[13] Bu prensibin, Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Komitesinin 32 sayılı Genel Yorumunda da altı çizilmektedir:

 

İnsan haklarının korunmasının temelinde yer alan masumiyet karinesi, savcılık makamına suçu kanıtlama yükümlülüğü getirmekte, suçun kesin olarak ve makul şüphenin ötesinde kanıtlanmasına kadar herhangi bir suçun varsayılmamasını garanti etmekte, suçlanan kişinin şüpheden faydalanmasını sağlamakta ve bir suç eylemi ile suçlanan kişilerin bu ilke ile uyumlu olarak muamele görmesi gerektiğini belirtmektedir.[14]

 

  1. Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Komitesi şunu açıkça ortaya koymuştur ki, herhangi bir ceza gerektiren suça ilişkin olarak bir hükmün verilmesi için, savcılık makamının söz konusu suçun her bir unsurunun gerekli standarda göre kanıtlandığını göstermesi gerekmektedir:

 

Bir eylem veya ihmalin ceza hükmü gerektirecek bir suç olup olmadığı, soyut olarak tespit edilebilecek bir konu değildir; aksine bu soru sadece suç unsurlarını ispatlayan kanıtların sunulması üzerine suçun gerekli standartlara uygun olarak ispatlandığı bir yargılama sonrası cevaplanabilir.  Eğer ulusal (veya uluslararası) kanunlarda tarif edildiği şekilde suçun gerekli herhangi bir unsurunun mevcut olduğu uygun şekilde kanıtlanamıyor ise, bu durumda söz konusu eylem veya ihmal nedeniyle bir kişi hakkında suçlu hükmü verilmesi nullum crimen sine lege ilkesini ve Madde 15 paragraf 1’de belirtilmiş olan hukuki kesinlik ilkesini ihlal edecektir.[15]

 

  1. Suçun vuku bulduğu sonucundan başka hiçbir olası vargıya yer bırakmayacak şekilde suçun gerekli her bir unsuruna ilişkin güçlü ve ispatlayıcı kanıt bulunmalıdır. Bir mahkemenin yargısı, salt suçlamalara veya varsayımlara değil önüne sunulmuş olan kanıtlara dayanmalıdır.[16] Uluslararası ceza hukukunda, bu ilke uluslararası ceza heyetlerinin ve Uluslararası Ceza Mahkemesi’nin kararlarına ve tüzüklerine dahil edilmiştir. Yugoslavya Mahkemesi, bu standardın “suçlanan kişinin suçlu olması dışında, kanıtın herhangi bir makul açıklamasının olmadığı yönünde tatmin edici bulguya ulaşılmasını gerektirmekte olduğunu” belirtmiştir.[17]

 

  1. Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi, bir dizi davada Türk mahkemelerinin 3713 sayılı Kanuna muhalefetle bir terör örgütünü öven “propaganda” için verdiği hükümleri değerlendirmiştir. Özellikle, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi sadece farklı fikir ortaya koymanın bir suç teşkil etmediğinin altını çizmiştir; şiddete veya silahlı direnişe teşvik etmek suçun önemli bir unsurudur. Gerekli ispat kurallarına uygun olarak kişinin konuşma eylemlerini şiddete veya silahlı direnişe kışkırtmak için yaptığını ispatlayamayan bir hüküm, söz konusu hükmün temelsiz olmasına neden olacaktır. Örneğin, Faruk Temel ile Türkiye arasındaki davada Mahkeme, davacıya karşı verilen hükmün ve tabi tutulduğu muamelenin Avrupa Sözleşmesinin 10’uncu maddesini ihlal ettiğini tespitle şunları kaydetmiştir:  “Bir bütün olarak okunduğunda beyan şiddet kullanımı, silahlı direniş veya ayaklanmayı teşvik etmemektedir ve – göz önüne alınması gereken temel bir unsur olarak – bir nefret söylemi teşkil etmemektedir.  Beyanın içeriği, tanımlanan bireylere yönelik derin ve rasyonel olmayan kin ve nefreti aşılayarak şiddeti destekleme eğiliminde de değildir.  Netice olarak başvuru sahibinin mahkumiyeti  , “acil bir toplumsal ihtiyacı” karşılamamaktadır.”[18]

 

  1. Öner ve Türk’ün Türkiye’ye karşı davasında, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi, “söz konusu konuşmanın, Türkiye’nin Kürt sorununa ilişkin politikalarının eleştiren bir değerlendirmesinden oluştuğunu” gözlemlemiştir. “Başvuru sahipleri, hükümetin belli politikaları, güvenlik güçlerinin uygulamaları, Abdullah Öcalan’ın tutukluluk koşullarına ilişkin hoşnutsuzluklarını ifade etmiştir ve yerel mahkemeler aleyhte konuşmanın terör propagandası içerdiği yorumunda bulunmuştur.  Mahkeme, bir bütün olarak ele alındığında, başvuru sahibinin konuşmasının, şiddet, silahlı direniş veya bir ayaklanmayı teşvik etmediği kanaatindedir.  Ayrıca, başvuru sahibi tarafından yapılan söz konusu konuşmalar, tanımlanabilir kişilere karşı derin ve irrasyonel nefret aşılayarak şiddeti teşvik etme niteliğine sahip değildir ve bu nedenle nefret söylemi olarak değerlendirilemez”.[19] Yargı kararlarının uygulanmasına ilişkin, Avrupa Konseyi Bakanlar Komitesi teessüfle ifade etmektedir ki: ….

Sözleşme standartları ile uyumlu olacak şekilde mevzuatın uygulanmasında herhangi bir ilerleme kaydedilmemiştir (bkz. M/Del/Dec(2017)1294/H46-31 1294’üncü toplantı, Eylül2017). Bu nedenle [Komite] yetkililerin; ceza soruşturmalarının, şiddet veya nefreti teşvik gibi zorlayıcı nedenler mevcut olmadığı sürece, sadece fikir ifade edilmesine dayalı olarak başlatılmamasını sağlamak için tamamlayıcı yasal veya diğer tedbirler;

şiddet veya nefreti teşvik gibi zorlayıcı nedenler mevcut olmadığı sürece, soruşturmadaki veya dava dosyasındaki kanıtlar, tamamen fikir ifade edilmesi ile ilişkili olduğu zaman, kişilerin polis gözetimi altına alınmaması veya tutuklanmamasını sağlamak için tedbirler; ve

Savcıların ve asliye hukuk mahkemelerinin uygulamalarının, Anayasa Mahkemesi içtihat hukukunun ve Sözleşme Madde 10 uyarınca Avrupa Mahkemesi hukukunun uygulanmasını sağlayacak şekilde uyumlulaştırılması için tedbirler almasını teşvik etmektedir.[20]

 

  1. DEVLETLERİN TERÖRLE MÜCADELE ÇABALARI BAĞLAMINDA İFADE ÖZGÜRLÜĞÜ: TEMEL GÜVENCELER

 

  1. İfade özgürlüğü, “demokratik bir toplumun en önemli temellerinden biridir ve toplumun gelişmesi ve her bir bireyin kişisel tatmini için gerekli temel koşullardan biridir.”[21] İfade özgürlüğü hakkı Türkiye Anayasasının 26’ıncı Maddesinde ve Avrupa İnsan Hakları Sözleşmesinin 10’uncu Maddesinde ve Medeni ve Siyasi Haklara İlişkin Uluslararası Sözleşme’nin 19’uncu Maddesinde tanınmakta olup, bunların her ikisi de Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Devleti üzerinde bağlayıcıdır.

 

  1. Çoğulcu, demokratik bir toplumda kamusal ve siyasi tartışmanın bir parçası olarak temel rolü göz önüne alındığında, ifade özgürlüğünün kapsamı geniştir.  Bu özellikle “siyasi söylem” ve “insan haklarının tartışılması” için geçerlidir.[22] Hak savunuculuğu dahil olmak üzere, ulusal ve uluslararası hukukta garanti edilen temel hakların ihlalleri konusundaki endişeleri öne çıkartan insan haklarına ilişkin tartışmalar özellikle Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Savunucularının Korunması Bildirgesi Madde 6 kapsamında korunmakta olup bu metin,[23] insan haklarının desteklenmesi ve korunmasında ifade özgürlüğünün önemini vurgulamaktadır:

 

Herkesin bireysel olarak ve başkalarıyla birlikte;

 

  1. b) İnsan haklarına ilişkin belgeler ile uygulanabilir uluslararası diğer belgelere uygun ola-rak tüm insan haklarına ve temel özgürlüklere ilişkin düşünceleri, haberleri ve bilgileri yayınlama, başkalarına iletmek veya özgürce yayma;
  2. c) İnsan haklarına ve temel özgürlüklere hem hukuksal olarak hem de pratikte uyulması yönünde inceleme, araştırma, saptama, değerlendirme, bu yollar ve diğer uygun yollarla kamunun dikkatini bu sorun üzerine çekme hakkı vardır.

 

  1. Siyasi tartışmanın önemi göz önüne alındığında, ifade özgürlüğü, -ifade rahatsız edici olarak değerlendirilse bile- sözü tanımaktadır.[24]

 

Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesinin kararları çevresinde tespit edildiği üzere, “Madde 10 paragraf 2’ye tabi olmak kaydıyla, [ifade özgürlüğü] sadece kabul edilebilir görülen veya rahatsız edici olmayan veya farklı görüş olarak değerlendirilen “bilgiler” veya “fikirler” için geçerli değildir, aynı zamanda rahatsız edici nitelikte olan, şok yaratan veya kışkırtıcı fikirler için de geçerlidir.   Bunlar, demokratik toplumun olmazsa olmazı olan çoğulculuk, tolerans ve geniş görüşlülüğünün gereklilikleridir[25].” Bir dizi davada, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi ifade özgürlüğü hakkı kapsamında yer alan dilin, örneğin yaşam hakkı gibi temel haklara yönelik ihlal iddiaları konusundaki endişeleri gündeme getirmek için kullanıldığı durumlarda “katliam” gibi kelimeleri de içerdiğini kabul etmektedir.[26] Mevcut dava ile en çok ilişkili olarak, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi, söz konusu hakkın “Kürt sorununa ilişkin Türkiye’nin politikalarının eleştirel bir şekilde değerlendirilmesi” ve “hükümetin belli politikalarına, güvenlik güçlerinin uygulamalarına ve Abdullah Öcalan’ın tutukluluk koşullarına ilişkin memnuniyetsizliği” içeren konuşmaları kapsadığını tespit etmiştir.”[27]

 

 

 

 

İfade özgürlüğü hakkına uygulanan sınırlamalar

 

  1. İfade özgürlüğü hakkı tanımlanmış bir haktır. Açıklanan bir ifade hakkın kapsamı dahilinde yer aldığında, devlet bazı durumlar altında meşru bir şekilde hakkın icra edilmesini sınırlandırabilir, ancak bu sınırlandırmanın kanun ile öngörülmüş olması, meşru bir amacının bulunması ve orantılı olması gerekmektedir. İfade özgürlüğü bu nedenle kural olup her türlü sınırlandırma istisnaidir.

 

Kanun tarafından öngörülmüş olması

 

  1. İfade özgürlüğü “sıkı bir şekilde yorumlanması gereken istisnalara tabidir ve her türlü kısıtlama ihtiyacı ikna edici bir şekilde tespit edilmelidir”.”[28] Belli ifade biçimlerinin suç olarak nitelendirilmesi gibi bu hakka yönelik her türlü müdahale kanunda belirtilmelidir. Bu kanun, “ilgili kişinin kendi davranışlarını düzenlemesini sağlayacak kadar yeterli kesinlikte formüle edilmelidir:  söz konusu şahıs –ihtiyaç duyulması durumunda uygun tavsiyeler çerçevesinde – koşullara göre makul olan bir ölçüde – belli bir eylemin neden olacağı sonuçları öngörebilmelidir.”[29] Buna ek olarak, yasa hükümlerinin “hukukun üstünlüğü” ile uyumlu olması sağlanmalıdır.”[30]

 

  1. Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Komitesi tarafından belirtildiği üzere, “terörün teşvik edilmesi ve ’aşırılıkçı faaliyetler’ gibi suçlar ile terörizmin ‘övülmesi’, ‘yüceltilmesi’ veya ‘haklı gösterilmesi’ gibi suçlar ifade özgürlüğüne gereksiz veya orantısız biçimde müdahaleye neden olmamaları için açık bir şekilde tanımlanmalı” ki bir şekilde tanımlanmalıdır.”[31]

 

  1. Bu kesinlik gerekliliği, terör örgütü propagandasını yasa dışı ilan eden 3713 sayılı Terörle Mücadele Kanununun 7(2)Maddesi için de geçerlidir.  Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi, özellikle yorumlamanın tamamen net olmadığı noktalarda olmak üzere, 7(2) maddesinde erişilebilirlik ve öngörülebilirliğin olmamasını eleştirmiştir.[32]

 

  1. Ayrıca, Birleşmiş Milletler Düşünce ve İfade Özgürlüğü Hakkının Korunması ve Desteklenmesi Özel Raportörü da ifade özgürlüğüne ilişkin geçerli uluslararası insan hakları standartları ışığı altında Türk mevzuatını yorumlarken bir çok eksiklik tespit etmiştir:

 

Hükümet, terörist tehditlere karşı koruma konusunda kritik bir göreve sahiptir, ancak uluslararası hukuk, terörle mücadelede insan haklarına saygı duyulmasını zorunlu kılmaktadır. Bu ikili zorunlulukla paralel olarak, ceza gerektiren suçlar dar bir şekilde tanımlanmalı ve zorunluluk ve orantılılık standartlarının sıkı bir şekilde uygulanması ile paralel olarak uygulanmalıdır.  Buna rağmen, Türk mevzuatındaki terörle mücadele ve ulusal güvenlik hükümleri, yeterli adli gözetim olmadan nesnel yorumlamaya izin verecek şekilde son derece geniş ve muğlak bir dil yoluyla ifade özgürlüğünü kısıtlamak için kullanılmaktadır.[33]

 

Meşru amaç

 

  1. İfade özgürlüğünün önündeki her türlü kısıtlama, ulusal güvenlik ve kamu düzeninin korunması gibi meşru bir amaca hizmet etmelidir, ancak bu amaçlar soyut bir şekilde yorumlanamaz.  Her ne kadar Terörle Mücadele Kanunu’nun amacı meşru olsa da, “Sözleşme haklarına yönelik müdahaleye izin veren hükümler kısıtlayıcı bir şekilde yorumlanmalıdır..”[34]Bu, herhangi bir beyanın ulusal güvenlik ve kamu emniyetini gerçekten tehlikeye attığı yönünde yeterli standartta kanıt sunulmasını gerektirmektedir. Bir beyanın hükümetin herhangi bir hareketini eleştirmesi ve bu nedenle uygunsuz olarak değerlendirilmesi beyanı kısıtlamak için yeterli değildir.  Birleşmiş Milletler Düşünce ve İfade Özgürlüğü Hakkının Desteklenmesi ve Korunması Özel Raportörü Türkiye misyonundan takiben “ulusal güvenlik ve kamu huzuru gibi meşru çıkarları korumak için ifade özgürlüğü kısıtlamalarının gerekli olduğu yönünde yeterli kanıt bulunmamaktadır…” sonucuna varmıştır. [35]

 

Orantılılık

 

  1. Aynı zamanda, demokratik bir toplumda, her türlü kısıtlama “acil bir toplumsal ihtiyacın” [36] varlığına işaret eden  bir zorunluluk olmalıdır. Buna göre “söz konusu müdahalenin amaçlanan meşru maksatlar ile orantılı olup olmadığı ve ulusal merciler tarafından öne sürülen nedenlerin ilgili ve yeterli olup olmadığını tespit etmek için bir bağlamsal değerlendirme yapılmalıdır”. Bunu yaparken Mahkeme, yerel mercilerin Madde 10’da belirtilmiş olan ilkeler ile uyumlu olan standartları uyguladıklarından ve aynı zamanda ilgili olayların kabul edilebilir bir şekilde değerlendirilmesini temel aldıklarından emin olması gerektiğini öngörür.[37]

 

  1. Devletler meşru bir şekilde belli terör eylemlerini suç olarak sınıflandırabilir ve hatta 23 Mart 2012 tarihinde Türkiye tarafından onaylanan Avrupa Konseyi Terörün Önlenmesi Sözleşmesi (196/2005) gibi taraf oldukları anlaşmalar ve Birleşmiş Milletler Güvenlik Konseyi kararları uyarınca bunu yapmak yükümlülüğünde olabilir. Ancak söz konusu terörle mücadele mevzuatı ve bunların yorumlanması ve uygulanması, ifade özgürlüğü hakkı ile uyumlu olmalıdır. Avrupa Konseyi Terörün Önlenmesi Sözleşmesi Madde 12 (1)’de kabul edildiği üzere:

 

Her bir Taraf, İnsan Hakları ve Temel Özgürlüklerin Korunmasına dair Sözleşme, Uluslararası Medeni ve Siyasi Haklar Sözleşmesi ve uluslararası hukuk uyarınca diğer yükümlülüklerinde yer aldığı şekilde ve o Tarafa uygulanabildiği durumlarda, insan hakları yükümlülüklerine, özellikle ifade özgürlüğüne…saygı göstererek bu Sözleşmenin 5 ila 7 ve 9. maddelerde yer alan konuların suç haline getirilmesinin ihdasını, uygulanmasını ve yerine getirilmesi sağlayacaktır.

  1. Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi, konuşmanın niteliği ve konuşmacı, şiddete teşvik ettiği iddia edilen herhangi bir beyanın içeriği, ve bağlamı değerlendirilerek, söz konusu beyanın şiddete neden olma olasılığının bulunup bulunmadığını göz önüne alarak ifade özgürlüğünün suç sayılmasını mercek altına almaktadır.  “Bir bütün olarak ele alındığında, metinlerin şiddete teşvik ediyor olarak değerlendirilip değerlendirilemeyeceğini tespit etmek amacıyla, kullanılan kelimelere ve bunların hangi bağlamda yayınlandığına dikkat edilmelidir.”[38]

 

Yukarıdaki açıklamalar açısından Ocak 2016’da yayınlanmış olan “Barış İçin Akademisyenler” Bildirisi

 

  1. “Bu Suça Ortak Olmayacağız” bildirisi, akademisyenler ve araştırmacılar tarafından, Türkiye’nin Güney Doğusunda güvenlik güçlerinin faaliyetlerine ve bunların bölge halklarının hakları üzerindeki etkisine ilişkin daha geniş bir siyasi tartışmanın bir parçası olarak yayınlanmış ve imzalanmıştır. Böylelikle, kamu kurumlarına ilişkin toplumsal tartışmaya katkı sağlamıştır.  Bir genel kural olarak, “Medeni ve Siyasi Haklar Sözleşmesince kamusal alandaki kamusal figürler ve kamu kurumlarına ilişkin kamusal tartışma koşullarında, özgür ifadeye verilen değer özellikle yüksek düzeydedir.”[39] İfade özgürlüğü hakkına ilişkin uluslararası insan hakları kurallarına göre akademisyenler veya önemli pozisyonlarda bulunan diğer kişiler için herhangi bir kendini kısıtlama yükümlülüğü bulunmamaktadır.  Bunun aksine olarak, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi şunu vurgulamıştır: “ifade özgürlüğün son derece önemli olduğu siyasi konuşma veya tartışma alanında bu özgürlük üzerindeki kısıtlamalar için Sözleşme Madde 10 paragraf 2 altında çok sınırlı bir alan tanınmaktadır.”[40] Bu “ilkeler aynı zamanda, terörle mücadelenin bir parçası olarak, yerel merciler tarafından ulusal güvenliği ve kamu düzenini korumak için alınan tedbirler için de geçerlidir.”[41]

 

  1. Bildirinin akademisyen yazarları ve imzacıları, bu bildiriyi akademik özgürlüklerini icra etme bağlamında yayınlamış ve imzalamıştır. Bu kişiler aynı zamanda Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Savunucularının Korunması Bildirgesi’nde tanındığı üzere insan hakları savunucularıdır, yani “tüm insan hakları ihlallerinin ve halkların ve bireylerin temel özgürlüklerine yönelik ihlallerin etkili bir şekilde ortadan kaldırılmasına katkı sağlayan kişiler, gruplar ve derneklerdir”.

 

  1. İnsan hakları ihlallerine dikkati çeken ve hesap verme sorumluluğu ve ihlallerin sona ermesi talebinde bulunan bir bildirinin yayınlanması,  insan haklarının desteklenmesi ve korumasının tanınan kapsamı dahilinde yer almaktadır.  Bu, bireyler veya gruplar adına insan hakları durumlarının ele alınması, ihlaller konusunda bilgilerin yayılması ve hesap verme sorumluluğunu güvenceye alma ve cezasızlığı sonlandırma amacına hizmet eden eylemleri içermektedir.[42] Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Savunucularının Korunması Bildirgesi, insan hakları savunucularının önemli bir hizmette bulundukları ve özel korumayı hak ettiklerini kabul etmektedir.[43]Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Komitesi aynı şekilde şunu kabul etmiştir: “Devletler, ifade özgürlüğü haklarını kullanan kişilerin susturulmasına yönelik saldırılara karşı koruma sağlamak üzere etkili tedbirleri uygulamaya koymalıdır. Medeni ve Siyasi Haklar Uluslararası Sözleşmesi’nin 19. Maddesi’nin 3. Paragraf’ı, çoğulcu demokrasi, demokratik inançlar ve insan haklarının herhangi bir şekilde savunulmasını susturmak için bir gerekçe olarak asla öne sürülemez.”[44]

 

  1. Yukarıda belirtilmiş olan üç kademeli sınamanın ikinci unsuruna göre (paragraf 29), ifade özgürlüğüne getirilebilecek herhangi bir kısıtlama sadece beyan şiddeti teşvik ediyorsa veya bir şiddet suçuna aracılık ediyorsa haklı görülme niteliğine sahip olacaktır. “Bu Suça Ortak Olmayacağız” bildirisi, “kasıtlı ve planlı kıyım”, “işkence”, ve “sürgün” gibi ifadeler kullanmaktadır.  Bu terimler, iddia olunan ihlallere yöneliktir ve bunların eleştiri olarak değerlendirilip değerlendirilmeyeceğine bakılmaksızın, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi, sadece söz konusu terminolojinin kullanılmasının şiddeti teşvik etme niteliğinde olmadığını her defasında beyan etmiştir.[45]

 

  1. Bildiri şiddetten bahsetmemektedir, bu yönde herhangi bir tehdit içermemektedir ve terörü desteklemeye yönelik bir niyeti ifade eden bir içeriğe sahip değildir. Terör eylemlerini meşru gösterme, veya Türkiye’nin uluslararası insan hakları hukuku ile uyumlu olarak terörle mücadele tedbirleri almasını önlemeye yönelik herhangi bir niyete ilişkin kanıt bulunmamaktadır. Bunun aksine, beyan, insan hakları ihlalleri ve şiddetin sona ermesi ve duruma barışçıl bir çözüm bulunması için çağrı yapmaktadır. Bu nedenle, gerçeğin açığa çıkarılmasına yönelik olarak uluslararası insan hakları standartlarına uygunluğu teşvik etmek üzere meşru bir savunuculuk eylemi teşkil etmektedir.

 

  1. Avrupa Konseyi İnsan Hakları Komiseri, “ özellikle de Komiserin görüşüne göre sokağa çıkma yasakları ve terörle mücadele operasyonları sırasında gerçekleştirilen insan hakları ihlalleri göz önüne alındığı zaman, bu bildiriyi açık bir şekilde ifade özgürlüğünün sınırları dahilinde ve arkasındaki niyetleri meşru ve kamu çıkarına yönelik olarak gördüğü ” şeklinde açıklamada bulunmuştur.[46]

 

  1. Bildiri, dolaylı bir şekilde teşvik de ifade etmemektedir. Katliam veya işkence gibi belli terimlerin kullanılması, şiddeti tahrik etmek veya terör suçuna aracılığı desteklemek için yeterli değildir.  Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesine göre, devletler, görüşler şiddeti tahrik etmediğinde, yani şiddet yöntemleri veya kanlı intikam ifadelerinin kullanımını savunmadığı, veya destekleyicilerinin amaçlarına ulaşması için terör eylemlerine aracılığı haklı göstermediği sürece kamuoyunun bilgilenme hakkını kısıtlayacak şekilde ulusal güvenlik gibi amaçları öne süremez ve belirli kişilere yönelik derin ve rasyonel olmayan bir nefreti körükleyerek şiddeti destekliyor şeklinde yorumlanamaz.[47]

 

  1. İfade özgürlüğüne ilişkin olarak uygulanan sınamaların herhangi birisine göre bu bildiri, doğrudan veya dolaylı olarak şiddet çağrısı yapmamaktadır, şiddetle veya şiddet tehdidi ile gösterilebilir bir bağlantısı yoktur ve şiddetle sonuçlanacak açık ve mevcut bir tehlike teşkil etmemektedir. Herhangi bir terör örgütünün açık bir şekilde övülmesi veya propagandasının yapılmasının kanıtı bulunmamaktadır. Bunun aksine, beyan her türlü şiddeti açık bir şekilde kınamaktadır.

 

  1. DEVLETLERİN TERÖRLE MÜCADELE BAĞLAMINDA İNSAN HAKLARI SAVUNUCULARININ ÇALIŞMALARINI DESTEKLEME KONUSUNDAKİ ÖNEMLİ ROLÜ

 

  1. İfade özgürlüğü çerçevesinde insan hakları savunucularının çalışmalarının korunması önceki bölümde açıklanmıştır. Burada şunu eklemek yeterli olacaktır ki ilgili uluslararası standartlar ile uyumlu olarak, Devletin yükümlülüğü sadece insan hakları savunucularının çalışmasına engel olmaktan imtina etmek değildir – tüm Devletler, insan hakları savunucularının serbest bir şekilde çalışmalarını gerçekleştirebilecekleri bir ortamı sağlamak için pozitif adımlar atma yükümlülüğündedir. Özellikle, Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Savunucularının Korunması Bildirgesi 12. Maddesi’nde şunu açıklamaktadır:

 

2- Devlet, bu bildirgede amaçlanan hakların meşru kullanımı çerçevesinde şiddet, tehdit, mi-silleme eylemi, fiili veya hukuksal ayrımcılık, baskı veya diğer keyfi hareketlere karşı, bireysel olarak ve başkalarıyla birlikte hareket eden tüm kişilerin yetkili otoritelerce korunması için gerekli tüm önlemlerin alınmasını dikkatle izler.
Bu bakımdan, herkes, bireysel olarak ve başkalarıyla birlikte, barışçı yollarla, insan haklarının ve temel özgürlüklerin ihlaline neden olan, ve devletin ihmali olan durumlar da dahil olmak üzere, devlete isnat edilebilen etkinlik ve eylemlerle birlikte başka grup ve bireylerce işlenmiş insan hakları ve temel özgürlüklerin kullanılmasıyla ilgili şiddet eylemlerine karşı tepki gösterdiğinde, ulusal yasalarca etkin biçimde korunmaya hakkı vardır.

  1. 37’inci Ağır Ceza Mahkemesinin 19 Aralık 2018 tarihinde bu uluslararası standartlarla çelişkili olarak verdiği Dr. Rasime Şebnem Korur’a ilişkin mahkumiyet ve hapis kararı, Dr. Korur’un insan hakları savunucusu ve akademisyen olarak pozisyonunu ve basın ve medyayı kullanımını bir ağırlaştırıcı faktör olarak değerlendirmiş gözükmekte olup, bunun için kendisine verilen hapis cezası ağırlaştırılmıştır.

 

VII. TERÖRLE MÜCADELE KANUNU BAĞLAMINDA AKADEMİK ÖZGÜRLÜK

 

  1. Akademik özgürlüğün, ifade özgürlüğünün korunmuş bir bileşeni olduğu genel olarak kabul görmektedir. Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi düzenli bir şekilde Türkiye ile ilgili davalar da dahil olmak üzere “akademisyenlerin çalıştıkları sistem veya kurum hakkında görüşlerini özgürce ifade etmeleri ve bilgiyi ve doğruyu kısıtlama olmadan yaygınlaştırabilmeleri özgürlüğünü içeren akademik özgürlüğün öneminin” altını çizmiştir.[48] Ayrıca, akademik özgürlüğün “ akademik veya bilimsel araştırma ile sınırlı olmadığını, aynı zamanda akademisyenlerin araştırma , profesyonel uzmanlık ve yetkinlik alanlarında,  muhalif olsa veya popüler olmasa bile görüşlerini ve düşüncelerini serbest bir şekilde ifade etme özgürlüğünü de kapsadığını” teyit etmiştir. Bu, belli bir siyasi sistemde kamu kurumlarının işleyişinin incelenmesini ve bunun bir eleştirisini içerebilir.”[49]
  2. 1762 sayılı Önerisinde (2006), Avrupa Konseyi Parlamenterler Meclisi, akademik özgürlüğün korunması için bir beyanname kabul etmiş olup, bu, Magna Carta Universitatum ile uyumlu olarak, “araştırma ve eğitimde akademik özgürlüğün ifade ve eylem özgürlüğünü, bilgiyi yaygınlaştırma özgürlüğünü, araştırma yapma özgürlüğünü, bilgiyi ve doğruyu kısıtlamasız dağıtma özgülüğünü” güvence altına alması gerektiğini beyan etmektedir.
  3. Mevcut davada, 37’inci Ağır Ceza Mahkemesi’nin, akademisyenlerin beyanlarını suç olarak nitelendirip cezalandırarak akademik özgürlük haklarını ihlal ettiği görülmektedir.

 

 

TÜM BU GÖRÜŞLERİMİZİ SAYGILARIMIZLA SUNARIZ.

 

Londra, 20 Haziran 2019

 

 

[1] Uzman kişilerin geçmişlerine ilişkin ilave bilgiler şu web sitelerinde bulunabilir:

Dr.LutzOette: {0>https://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff46048.php<}0{>https://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff46048.php

Dr. Carla Ferstman : {0>https://www.essex.ac.uk/people/ferst81809/carla-ferstman<}0{>https://www.essex.ac.uk/people/ferst81809/carla-ferstman

[2] İnsan Hakları Komitesi, Genel Yorum No: 29, “Acil Durumlar (Madde 4)” paragraf 7, UN Doc. CCPR/C/21/Rev.1/Add.11 31 Ağustos 2001.

[3]Kafkaris v Cyprus, Başvuru no. 21906/04, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (12 Şubat 2008), parag. 137.

[4]Kafkaris v Yunanistan, Başvuru no. 14307/88, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (25 Mayıs 1993), parag. 52.

[5] İnsan hakları ve terörle mücadele Özel Raportörü, UN Doc. E/CN.4/2006/98 (2005) para. 42.

[6] Terörle mücadelede insan hakları ve temel özgürlüklerin desteklenmesi ve korunmasına ilişkin Özel Raportör Raporu, UN Doc. A/HRC/16/51, 22 Aralık 2010, paragraf 26.

[7] Bakanlar Komitesi tarafından 26 Eylül 2007 tarihinde Bakan Yardımcılarının 1005’inci toplantısında kabul edilen, kriz zamanlarında ifade ve bilgi edinme özgürlüğünün korunmasına ilişkin Avrupa Konseyinin Bakanlar Komitesi Kılavuz İlkeleri, Kılavuz İlke IV, paragraf 19

[8]CastilloPetruzzi ve ark. v. Peru (Merits, ReparationsandCosts) 30 Mayıs 1999 Kararı, Seri C No. 52, para. 121.

[9] Inter-Amerika Komisyonu Yıllık Raporu:  Peru, OEA/Ser.L/V/II.95, doc. 7 rev. (1996) Ch.VSection VIII, §4.

[10] Terörle Mücadelede İnsan Hakları ve Temel Özgürlüklerinin Desteklenmesi ve Korunmasına İlişkin Özel Raportörü Türkiye Misyonu (16-23 Nisan 2006) Raporu, 16 Kasım 2006.

[11]BkzFaruk Temel v. Türkiye, Başvuru no. 16853/05, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (1 Şubat 2011); Yavuz ve Yaylali v. Türkiye, Başvuru no. 12606/11, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (17 Aralık 2013).

[12] Örneğin bkz. Uluslararası Medeni ve Siyasi Haklar Sözleşmesi, Madde 14 (2), Avrupa İnsan Hakları Sözleşmesi Madde 6(2).

[13] İnsan Hakları Komitesi (HRC), Genel Yorum 32, CCPR/GC/32 (23 Ağustos 2007), para. 30; Barberà,Messegué ve Jabardo v İspanya, Başvuru No. 10590/83, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (6 Aralık 1988), para. 77; Telfner v Avusturya, Başvuru  No. 33501/96, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (20 Mart 2001), para. 15.

[14] HRC Genel yorum 32, para. 30.

[15]Nicholas v Avustralya, HRC, UN Doc. CCPR/C/80/D/1080/2002 (2004) §7.5.

[16]Telfner v Avusturya, Başvuru  No. 33501/96, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (20 Mart 2001), para. 19.

[17]Prosecutor v Milan Martić(IT-95-11-A), ICTY Temyiz Dairesi (8 Ekim 2008) para. 55, 61.

[18]Faruk Temel v. Türkiye, Başvuru no. 16853/05, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (1 Şubat 2011), para. 62. Ayrıca bkz , Savgin v. Türkiye, Başvuru no. 13304/03, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (2 Şubat 2010), para. 45.

[19]Öner ve Türk v. Türkiye, Başvuru no. 51962/12, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (31 Mart 2015), para. 24.

[20]Bkz, Avrupa Konseyi, Bakanlar Komitesi, https://hudoc.exec.coe.int/eng#{%22fulltext%22:[%22oner%22],%22EXECDocumentTypeCollection%22:[%22CEC%22],%22EXECLanguage%22:[%22ENG%22],%22EXECState%22:[%22TUR%22],%22EXECIsClosed%22:[%22False%22],%22EXECIdentifier%22:[%22004-36806%22]}

[21]Erdoğdu ve İnce vTürkiye (Büyük Daire), Başvuru No:  25067/94, 25068/94, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi  (8 Temmuz 1999), para. 47.

[22]İnsan Hakları Komitesi, Genel Yorum 34, Madde 19:  Fikir ve ifade özgürlüğü , UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 Eylül 2011), para.11.

[23]Bireylerin Hakları ve Sorumluluğunun Beyanı, Evrensel Olarak Tanınan İnsan Hakları ve Temel Özgürlükleri Desteklemek ve Korumak için Toplum Grupları ve Organları, A/RES/53/144 (8 March 1999)

[24] İnsan Hakları Komitesi, Genel Yorum 34, Madde 19:  Fikir ve ifade özgürlüğü , UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 Eylül 2011), para.11.

[25]Erdoğdu ve İnce vTürkiye (Büyük Daire), Başvuru No:  25067/94, 25068/94, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi  (8 Temmuz 1999), para. 47.

[26]Karkin v. Türkiye, Başvuru No. 43928/98, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (23 Eylül 2003), para. 34.

[27]Öner ve Türk v. Türkiye, Başvuru no. 51962/12, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (31 Mart 2015), para. 24.

[28]Erdoğdu ve İnce vTürkiye (Büyük Daire), Başvuru No:  25067/94, 25068/94, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi  (8 Temmuz 1999), para. 47.

[29]Perinçek v İsviçre  (Büyük Daire ), Application No. 27510/08, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (15 Ekim 2015), para. 131. Yukarıdaki meşruiyet ilkesi bölümüne bakınız.

[30]Belge v Türkiye, Başvuru No. 50171/09, 6/12/2016, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (6 Aralık 2016), para. 28.

[31] İnsan Hakları Komitesi, Genel Yorum 34, Madde 19:  Fikir ve ifade özgürlüğü, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 Eylül 2011), para. 46.

[32]Belge v Türkiye, Başvuru No. 50171/09, 6/12/2016, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (6 Aralık 2016), para. 29.

[33]Fikir ve ifade özgülüğü hakkının desteklenmesi ve korunmasına ilişkin Özel Raportörün, Türkiye misyonu raporu, UN Doc. A/HRC/35/22/Add.3 (21 June 2017), para 17.

[34]Perinçek v İsviçre  (Büyük Daire ), Application No. 27510/08, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (15 Ekim 2015), para.

[35] Fikir ve ifade özgülüğü hakkının desteklenmesi ve korunmasına ilişkin Özel Raportörün, Türkiye misyonu raporu, UN Doc. A/HRC/35/22/Add.3 (21 June 2017), para 7.

[36]Erdoğdu ve İnce vTürkiye (Büyük Daire), Başvuru No:  25067/94, 25068/94, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi  (8 Temmuz 1999), para. 47.

[37]A.g.e

[38]Özgür Gündem v Türkiye, Başvuru nos. 23144/93, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi(16 Mart 2000), para. 63

[39] İnsan Hakları Komitesi, Genel Yorum 34, Madde 19:  Görüş ve ifade özgürlüğü, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 Eylül 2011), para. 38.

[40]Belge v. Türkiye , Başvuru no. 50171/09, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (6 Aralık 2016), para.31.

[41]A.g.e. (referanslar atlanmıştır)

[42]Bkz. Birleşmiş Milletler İnsan Hakları Savunucuları Beyannamesi Madde 6 ve 12.

[43] Madde 2, age

[44] İnsan Hakları Komitesi, Genel Yorum 34, Madde 19:  Görüş ve ifade özgürlüğü, UN Doc. CCPR GC 34 (12 Eylül 2011), para. 23.

[45]Sürek v Türkiye No.4, Başvuru no. 24762/94, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (8 Temmuz 1999), para. 58.

[46]Avrupa Konseyi, İnsan Hakları Komiseri, Türkiye’deki ifade özgürlüğü ve medya özgürlüğü Bilgi Notu, CommDH(2017)5, para 62.

[47]Gözel ve Özer v Türkiye, Başvuru no. 43453/04; 31098/05, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (6 July 2010) para. 56 (Fransızca tercümesine dayalı olarak)

[48]Bkz, ör., Sorguç v. Türkiye, Başvuru no. 17089/03, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi (23 Haziran 2009), para. 35; Kula v. Türkiye , Başvuru no. 20233/06, Avrupa İnsan Hakları Mahkemesi  (19 Haziran 2018).

[49]Mustafa Erdoğan ve Diğerleri  v. Türkiye, Başvuru nos.346/04 ve 39779/04, Avrupa İnan Hakları MAhkemesi (27 May 2014), para. 40.